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gpthelastrebel
Thu Mar 12 2009, 04:36AM

Registered Member #1
Joined: Tue Jul 17 2007, 02:46PM
Posts: 3698
The first time I have read anything of this nature coming from a Union State. I found this site to be very informative and educational as well as balenced in its presentation.

GP


http://dig.lib.niu.edu/civilwar/law.html

"Nevertheless, Illinois Democrats, like their brethren all over the North and South, denounced the Emancipation Proclamation as "unwarrantable in military as in civil law; a gigantic usurpation, at once converting the war, professedly commenced by the administration for the vindication of the authority of the constitution, into a crusade for the sudden, unconditional and violent liberation of three million slaves."

[ Edited Sun Apr 07 2019, 04:53PM ]
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gpthelastrebel
Mon May 27 2013, 04:23PM

Registered Member #1
Joined: Tue Jul 17 2007, 02:46PM
Posts: 3698
Radical Republican Reign of Terror

From: bernhard1848©att.net

Russian Minister to Washington, Edouard de Stoeckl, was a close observer of the Lincoln administration and reliable judge of political events. He saw Lincoln as weak and vacillating, with the radical Republicans as the true “masters of the situation,” and had ”been told on good authority that a [radical] deputation demanded the President’s resignation.”

Bernhard Thuersam, Chairman
North Carolina War Between the States Sesquicentennial Commission
www.ncwbts150.com
"The Official Website of the North Carolina WBTS Sesquicentennial"


Radical Republican Reign of Terror:

“The fighting Italian patriot, Giuseppe Garibaldi, who had expressed a desire for a federal army command – providing the war would be fought for emancipating the slaves – rejoiced over the [emancipation] Proclamation. Garibaldi’s followers, the republican liberals of Italy whose red shirts had become symbols of freedom, added their lavish praise….

But in Washington, Stoeckl expressed deep regret that the Emancipation Proclamation had been issued. In a conference with [William] Seward, the Russian Minister told Lincoln’s Secretary of State that he regards the Proclamation “as but a futile menace,” because “it set up a further barrier to the reconciliation of the North and South – always the hope of Russia.”

In a lengthy report to St. Petersburg shortly after Lincoln issued the preliminary Proclamation, Stoeckl charged that radical Republican leaders had forced Lincoln into this extreme measure in a desperate effort to maintain their waning political powers. “Their program calls for immediate and unconditional emancipation, the arming of the slaves against their masters; the confiscation of all property belonging to the insurgents; and finally the inauguration in the North of a reign of terror to silence the protests of the timid conservatives.”

Stoeckl described Lincoln as vacillating and resorting to half measures because “he does not dare to go along” with the radicals, nor does he possess the courage to break with them:

“[Lincoln] signed the confiscation bill. He authorized wholesale arrests in the North and even suspended the writ of habeas corpus. [Radicals demanded] that Lincoln give to Governor Morton of Illinois, and ultra-radical, the chief command of affairs of war in the West, and delegate to him all the powers which the Constitution invested in the Chief Executive of the Republic.

The President, intimidated by [the] intrigues and violent attacks, decided to publish the Proclamation…[but] settles the question only halfway; slavery will continue to exist in the States which recognize the Union….Slavery would not be abolished….where the decrees of the President could not be executed. A new proclamation issued by the President suspends the writ of habeas corpus and establishes martial law in the entire United States. It is a new concession wrung from Mr. Lincoln by the radicals.”

(Lincoln and the Radicals, Albert A. Woldman, World Publishing Company, 1952, pp. 182-185)


(Used Withe Permission)
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gpthelastrebel
Mon May 27 2013, 04:25PM

Registered Member #1
Joined: Tue Jul 17 2007, 02:46PM
Posts: 3698
Acts of Oppression Made in the Name of Liberty

From: bernhard1848©att.net

From the Russian Embassy at Washington, diplomat Baron Edouard de Stoeckl monitored the Lincoln administration and reported in detail to St. Petersburg. He concluded as other observers did that Lincoln’s primary goal was to maintain a territorial union by force, with slavery intact and confined to existing geographic limits.

Bernhard Thuersam, Chairman
North Carolina War Between the States Sesquicentennial Commission
www.ncwbts150.com
"The Official Website of the North Carolina WBTS Sesquicentennial"


Acts of Oppression Made in the Name of Liberty:

“If the reign of the demagogues continues for a long time, General Fremont is destined to play an important role. He is already the standard-bearer of the radical [Republican] party, and he will become the head of the party because of his superiority over the other leaders, among whom are only mediocre men and not a single leader of talent and energy.

Continuing his analysis of the “deplorable situation,” Stoeckl discussed in some detail the efforts of the radicals to gain control of affairs.

“General Fremont acted without authorization of [President Lincoln] and even contrary to his instructions, which forbid him to act in regard to the slave States of the west where Unionists are still fairly numerous. So the President was greatly astonished to learn about the [emancipation] proclamation of General Fremont. He regarded is as an act of insubordination.

For awhile there was consideration of dismissal [of Fremont], but after all [Lincoln] did nothing and did not even dare to reprimand him. The radicals, emboldened by this triumph, demand today that the edicts laid down by General Fremont in Missouri shall be applied everywhere. In other words, they demand that the government should convert the present struggle into a war of extermination.

What the radical party fears most is a reaction which would bring its ruin. So it takes advantage of the hold it has on the administration in order to drive it to extreme measures. The government has forbidden postmasters to carry newspapers in the mails which advocate conciliation and compromise. The result has been that the majority of newspapers which were opposed to war have had to suspend publication.

In several towns the extremists have gone even further. They have stirred up the populace, which has smashed the plants of the moderate newspapers. Conditions are such that mere denunciation by a general is sufficient for a person to be arrested and imprisoned. The act of habeas corpus and all the guarantees which the Americans have appeared to prize so much, have vanished and given way to martial law, which….is being enforced throughout the North.

We are not far from a reign of terror such as existed during the great French Revolution, and what makes the resemblance more striking is that all these acts of oppression are made in the name of liberty.”

Stoeckl wrote that the people of the North were being misled into believing that these drastic measures would hasten the peaceful restoration of the Union. But he did not believe the deception could persist:

“People will not be duped long by their political leaders. The reaction will necessarily take place. But unfortunately it will come too late to repair the harm that the demagogues have done to the country. It will be necessary finally to revolutionize the political and administrative institutions…which have been weakened upon the first rock against which the nation has been hurled. In the North and in the South they will have to reconstruct the edifice which the founders of the Republic have had so much trouble in building….The present war is only the prelude of the political convulsions which this country will have to pass through.”

(Lincoln and the Radicals, Albert A. Woldman, World Publishing Company, 1952, pp. 80-83)

(Uszed With Permission)
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