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Southern Heritage Advancement Preservation and Education :: Forums :: General :: General Discussion
 
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Confederate History Month, 2010 Immortal Captives ---Capt. Alex Bedford
Moderators: gpthelastrebel, Patrick
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gpthelastrebel
Fri Apr 09 2010, 01:37PM

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Joined: Tue Jul 17 2007, 02:46PM
Posts: 3698
Immortal Captives by Mauriel Phillips Joslyn, page 101

At Morris Island.

Sept 10th-- As the Yankees are continually boasting about how well they feed us, I will attempt to give account of each meal. Roll call one and one half hours by sun for breakfast, three crackers issued, one tablespoon of rice........ Rations for dinner, one half pint bean soup, two crackers, wormy and full of bugs. Rations for Supper, two ounces of bacon, two crackers, wormy as usual
Sept 11 ....... water full of wiggle tails today. Rations old salt beef, two ounces, one cracker, wormy as usual.
Sept 12 .... Rations for breakfast two ounces old salt beef, so badly spoiled that we could not eat half of it. Three crackers, musty and full of worms --- not fit for hogs. One of our officers showed his rations of crackers to the Colonel in charge of us (Col Howell, 54th Mass.) His reply was "do you know are now in Charleston on Bread and water?" The prisoners wished to know the reason. His reply "because they are Yankees".... I am well but feel very weak and hungry, falling off fast.
Sept. 15..... Wrote to my wife, very hungry, never any other way.
Sept 16...... Am very hungry, every time I sleep I dream of something to eat. The crackers we get will not make two good mouthfulls, they arte so thin and small.

Capt. Alex Bedford
3rd Mo. cav.



[ Edited Fri Apr 09 2010, 01:39PM ]
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gpthelastrebel
Sat Mar 16 2019, 04:35PM

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Joined: Tue Jul 17 2007, 02:46PM
Posts: 3698


Six Hundred Southern Officers at Morris Island

“After weary months in Washington, during which time I was shown many kindnesses and attentions from Southern sympathizers, I was carried to Fort Delaware prison. After a lapse of some time I was drawn in with the lot of six hundred officers to be carried to “Morris Island,” to be placed under the fire of our own guns at Charleston. We were crowded in the dark hole of the vessel, only equal to the “Black Hole of Calcutta,” and packed on shelves like goods in a store, without any light or air, except that driven down a shaft by wind-sails.

On our arrival we were put in a “stockade pen,” between “Fort Wagner and Fort Gregg,” and guarded by a Negro regiment. For forty-five days we sat upon the sands and witnessed the burning fuses from bombs, larger than nail-kegs continuously fired night and day by our men at the forts. If they overshot the one or undershot the other they’d hit us. But that God marks the sparrow’s fall, protected us.

On the eve of our leaving for “Hilton Head,” the Negroes on guard fired into some of us. I saw three fall either killed or wounded; they were hurriedly moved out. I never learned their fate.

Three of our number got the cabin maid to steal life preservers from the cabins and quietly slid over-board where sharks were as thick as minnows. Two were exhausted from thirst and lack of food and were captured on Pinckney Island; the third reached Charleston.

They gave us absolutely nothing at all to eat for forty-five days but a little rotten corn meal filled with black bugs, without salt or anyway to cook it. Our comrades were dying by squads daily, the dead house was filled all the time with the corpses. Scores of cats would enter through holes and prey upon the dead.”

Lt. Col. C.B. Christian, Walker’s Ford, Amherst County, Virginia

(Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XXXVII, R.A. Brock, editor, 1909, pp. 241-242)
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