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gpthelastrebel
Wed Mar 04 2009, 06:51PM

Registered Member #1
Joined: Tue Jul 17 2007, 02:46PM
Posts: 3695
I had found these resolutions online some years ago and failed to copy the website as a source. I can no longer find this website, but thought everyone would enjoy reading these resolutions. Note freeing the slaves is not mentioned.

GP
*********************************************************************


Concurrent Resolutions tendering aid to the President of the United States in support of the Constitution and the Union
STATE OF, NEW YORK.
In Assembly, Jan. 11, 1861.
Whereas, Treason, as defined by the Constitution of the United States, exists in one or more of the States of this Confederacy, and
Whereas, the insurgent State of South Carolina after seizing the Post Office, Custom House, Moneys and Fortifications of the Federal Government, has, by firing into a vessel ordered by the Government to convey troops and provisions to Fort Sumter, virtually declared war; and whereas, the forts and property of the United States Government in Georgia, Alabama and Louisiana, have been unlawfully seized with hostile intentions; and whereas, further, Senators in Congress avow and maintain their treasonable acts; therefore
Resolved, (If the Senate concur,) That the Legislature of New York, profoundly impressed with the value of the Union, and determined to preserve it unimpaired, hail with joy the recent firm, dignified and patriotic Special Message of the President of the United States, and that we tender to him, through the Chief Magistrate of our own State, whatever aid in men and money he may require to enable him to enforce the laws and upheld the authority of the Federal Government. And that in defence of "the more perfect Union," which has conferred prosperity and happiness upon the American people, renewing the pledge given and redeemed by our Fathers, we are ready to devote "our fortunes, our lives, and our sacred honor" in upholding, the Union and the Constitution.
Resolved, (If the Senate concur,) That the Union-loving Representatives and Citizens of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Missouri and Tennessee, who labor with devoted courage and patriotism to withhold their States from the vortex of Secession, are entitled to the gratitude and admiration of the whole people.
Resolved, (If the Senate concur,) That the Governor be respectfully requested to forward, forthwith, copies of the foregoing resolutions to the President of the Nation, and the Governors of all the States of the Union.
The preceding Preamble and Resolutions were duly passed.
By order. H.A. RISLEY, Clerk.
In Senate, January 11, 1861. The preceding Preamble and Resolutions were duly passed.
By order. JAMES TERWILLIGER, Clerk.
*******************************************************************************

Joint Resolutions of the General Assembly of the State of Ohio, passed January 12, 1861.
RESOLVED by the General Assembly of the State of Ohio, as follows:
1. That the people of Ohio, believing that the preservation of the Unity of Government that constitutes the American people one people, is essential to the support of their tranquility at home, of their peace abroad, of their safety, of their prosperity, and of that very liberty which they so highly prize, are firmly and ardently attached to the National Constitution and the Union of the States.
2. That the General Government cannot permit the secession of any State without violating the obligations by which it is bound, under the compact, to the other States and to every citizen of the United States.
3. That, whilst the constitutional rights of every State in the Union should be preserved inviolate, the powers and authority of the National Government must be maintained, and the laws of Congress faithfully enforced, in every State and Territory, until repealed by Congress or adjudged to be unconstitutional by the proper ,judicial tribunal; and all attempts by State authorities to nullify the Constitution of the United States or the laws of the Federal Government, or to resist the execution thereof, are revolutionary in their character, and tend to the disruption of the best and wisest system of government in the world.
4. That the people of Ohio are inflexibly opposed to intermeddling with the internal affairs and domestic relations of the other States of the Union; in the same manner and to the same extent as they are opposed to any interference by the people of other States with their domestic concerns.
5. That it is the will and purpose of the people of Ohio to fulfil, in good faith, all their obligations under the Constitution of the United States, according to the spirit and intent thereof; and they demand the faithful discharge of the same duty by every State in the Union; and thus, as far as may be, to insure tranquility between the State of Ohio and the other States.
6. That it is incumbent upon any States having enactments on their statute books, conflicting with or rendering less efficient the Constitution or laws of the United States, to repeal them: and it is equally incumbent upon the General Government and the several States to secure to every citizen of the Union his rights in every State under that provision of the Constitution which guarantees to the citizens of each State all the privileges and immunities of the citizens of the several States, and thus inspire and restore confidence and a spirit of fraternal feeling between the different States of the Union.
7. That the Union loving citizens of those States who have labored, and still labor with devotional courage and patriotism, to withhold their States from the vortex of secession, are entitled to the admiration and gratitude of the whole American people.
8. That we hail with joy, the recent firm, dignified and patriotic special message of the President of the United States, and that the entire power and resources of Ohio, are hereby pledged whenever necessary and demanded, for the maintenance under strict subordination to the civil authority, of the Constitution and Laws of the General Government, by whomsoever administered.
9. That the Governor be requested to forward, forthwith, copies of the foregoing resolutions to the President of the nation, and to the Governors of all the States of the Union, and to each of the Senators and Representatives in Congress from this State, to be by them presented to each branch of the National Legislature.
ATTEST:
R. C. PARSONS,
Speaker of the House of Representatives.
R. C. KIRK,
President of the Senate.
[Scanned from a photocopy supplied by Sylvia Sherman of the Maine State Archives.]
******************************************************************************

Resolutions
Adopted by the Legislature of Pennsylvania, Jan. 24, 1861
Joint Resolutions relative to the maintenance of the Constitution and the Union.
WHEREAS, A Convention of delegates assembled in the city of Charleston, in the State of South Carolina, did on the twentieth day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty, adopt an ordinance entitled "An ordinance to dissolve the union between the State of South Carolina and other States united with her, under the compact, entitled the Constitution of the United States of America," whereby it is declared that the said Union is dissolved:
AND WHEREAS, It becomes the duty or the people of Pennsylvania, through their representatives in this General Assembly, to make known what they consider to be the objects sought, and the obligations and duties imposed by the Constitution; be it therefore,
Resolved, By the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, In General Assembly met, and it is hereby resolved, That the Constitution of the United States of America, was ordained and established as set forth in its preamble, by the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to themselves and their posterity, and if the people of any State in this Union, are not in the fall enjoyment of all the benefits intended to be secured to them by the said Constitution, if their rights under it are disregarded, their tranquility disturbed, their prosperity retarded, or their liberties imperiled by the people of any other State, full and adequate redress can, and ought to be provided for such grievances, through the action of Congress, and other proper departments of the National Government.
2. Resolved, That the people of Pennsylvania, entertain and desire to cherish "the most fraternal sentiments for their brethren of other States, and are ready now, as they have ever been, to co-operate in all measures needful for their welfare, security and happiness, under the Constitution which makes us one people. That while they cannot surrender their love of liberty inherited from the founders of their State, sealed with the blood of the Revolution, and witnessed in the history of their legislation, and while they claim the observance of all their rights under the Constitution, they nevertheless maintain now, as they have ever done, the Constitutional rights of the people of the slaveholding States, to the uninterrupted enjoyment of their own domestic institutions.
3. Resolved, That we adopt the sentiment and language of President Andrew Jackson, expressed in his message to Congress, on the sixteenth day of January, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-three: "That the right of the people of a single State, to absolve themselves at will, and without the consent of the other States, from their most solemn obligations, and hazard the liberties and happiness of the millions composing this Union, cannot be acknowledged; and that such authority is utterly repugnant, both to the principles upon which the general government is constituted, and the objects which it was expressly formed to attain."
4. Resolved, That the Constitution of the United States America, contains all tile powers necessary to the maintenance of its authority,. and it is the solemn and most imperative duty of the government, to adopt and carry into effect whatever measures may be necessary to that end, and the faith and the power of Pennsylvania, are hereby pledged to the support of such measures, in any manner, and to any extent that may be required of her, by the constituted authorities of the United States.
5. Resolved, That all plots, conspiracies and warlike demonstrations against the United States, in any section of the country, are treasonable in their character, and whatever power of the government is necessary to their suppression, should be applied to that purpose without hesitation or delay.
6. Resolved, That the Governor be, and be is hereby requested to transmit a copy of these Resolutions to the President of the United States, properly attested, under the Great Seal of the Commonwealth, and like attested copies to the Governors of the several States of this Union, and also to our Senators and Representatives in Congress, who are hereby requested to present the same to the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States.
(Signed.) E.W. Davis
Speaker of the House of Representatives
(Signed.) ROBT. M. PALMER
Speaker of the Senate
Approved --- The twenty-fourth day of January, Anno Domini, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one.
(Signed.) A.G. CURTIN
[Scanned from a photocopy supplied by Sylvia Sherman of the Maine State Archives.]
*******************************************************************************

Joint Resolutions in relation to the Union of the States.
Whereas, the people of New Jersey, conforming to the opinion of "the Father of his Country," consider the unity of the government, which constitutes the people of the United States one people, a main pillar in the edifice of their independence, the support of their tranquility at home and peace abroad, of their prosperity, and of that liberty which they so highly prize; and properly estimating the immense value of their National Union to their individual happiness, they cherish a cordial, habitual and immovable attachment to it as the palladium of their political safety and prosperity---therefore,
1. Be it resolved by the Senate and General Assembly Of the State of New Jersey, That it is the duty of every good citizen, in all suitable and proper ways, to stand by and sustain the Union of the States as transmitted to us by our fathers.
2. And be it resolved, That the government of the United States is a national government, and the Union it was designed to perfect is not a mere compact or league; and that the constitution was adopted in a spirit of mutual compromise and concession by the people of the United States, and can only be preserved by the constant recognition of that spirit.
3. And be it resolved, That however undoubted way be the right of the general government to maintain its authority and enforce its laws over all parts of the country, it is equally certain that forbearance and compromise are indispensable at this crisis to the perpetuity of the Union, and that it is the dictate of reason, wisdom and patriotism peacefully to adjust whatever differences exist between the different sections of our country.
4. And be it resolved, That the resolutions and propositions submitted to the Senate of the United States by the Hon. John J. Crittenden of Ky., for the compromise of the questions in dispute between the eople of the Northern and of the Southern States, or any other constitutional method that will permanently settle the question of slavery, will be acceptable to the people of the State of New Jersey, and the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Now Jersey be requested and earnestly alleged to support those resolutions and propositions.
5. And be it resolved, That as the Union of the States is in imminent danger, unless the remedies before suggested be speedily adopted, then, as a last resort, the State of New Jersey hereby makes application, according to the terms of the constitution, of the Congress of the United States to call a convention (of the States) to propose amendments to said constitution.
6. And be it resolved, That such of the States as have in force laws which interfere with the constitutional rights of citizens of the other States, either in regard to their persons or property, or which militate against, the just construction of that part of the constitution that provides that "the citizens of each State shall be entitled to all the privileges and immunities of citizens in the several States," are earnestly urged and requested, for the sake of peace and the Union, to repeal all such laws.
7. And be it resolved, That his Excellency Charles S. Olden, Peter D. Yroom Robert F. Stockton Benjamin Williamson, Joseph F. Randolph, Frederick T. Frelinghuysen, Rodman M. Price, William C. Alexander, and Thomas J. Stryker be appointed commissioners to confeer with Congress and our sister States, and urge upon them the importance of carrying into effect the principles and objects of the foregoing resolutions.
8. And be it resolved, That the commissioners above named, in addition to their other powers, be authorized to meet with those now or hereafter to be appointed by our sister State of Virginia, and such commissioners of other states as have been, or may be hereafter appointed, to meet at Washington on the fourth day of February next.
9. And be it resolved, That copies of the foregoing resolutions be sent to the President of the Senate and Speaker of the House of Representatives of the United States, and to the Senators and Representatives in Congress from New Jersey, and to the Governors of the several States.
Senate of New Jersey, January 24, 1861
These resolutions having been three times read and compared in the Senate,
Resolved, That the same do pass.
By order of the Senate,
EDMUND PERRY, President.
In the House of Assembly, January 25, 1861
These resolutions having been three times read and compared in the House of Assembly,
Resolved, That the same do pass.
By order of the House of Assembly,
F.H. TEESE, Speaker.
Approved, January 29, 1861.
CHARLES S. OLDEN, Governor.
*******************************************************************************

Joint Resolutions of Indiana State Legislature.
Whereas, The State of Virginia has transmitted to this State, resolutions adopted by the General Assembly, inviting all such States as are willing to unite with her in an earnest effort to adjust the present unhappy controversies in the spirit in which the Constitution was originally formed, to send Commissioners to meet those appointed by that State in Convention to be held in the city of Washington on the 4th day of February next, to consider, and if possible, to agree upon some suitable adjustment:
And whereas, some of the States to which invitations were extended by the State of Virginia have already responded, and appointed their Commissioners; therefore,
Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Indiana, That we accept the invitation of the State of Virginia in the true spirit of fraternal feeling, and that the Governor of this State is hereby directed and empowered to appoint five Commissioners to meet the Commissioners appointed by our sister States, to consult upon the unhappy differences now dividing the country; but the said Commissioners shall take no action that will commit this State, until nineteen of the States of the Union are represented, and without first having communicated with this General Assembly in regard to such action, and having received the authority of the same so to commit the State.
Resolved, That while we are not prepared to assent to the terms of settlement proposed by the State of Virginia, and are fully satisfied that the Constitution, if fairly interpreted and obeyed, contains ample provisions within itself for the correction of the evils complained of; still, with a disposition to reciprocate the patriotic desire of the State of Virginia, and to have harmoniously adjusted all differences existing between the States of the Union, this General Assembly is induced to respond to the invitation of Virginia by the appointment of the Commissioners herein provided for, but as the time fixed for the Convention to assemble is so near at hand, that the States cannot be represented, it is expected that the Commissioners on behalf of this State will insist that the Convention adjourn until such time as the States shall have an opportunity of being represented.
Resolved, That His Excellency the Governor is requested to transmit copies of these resolutions to the Executives of each of the States of the Union.
CYRUS M. ALLEN,
Speaker of the House of Representatives.
JNO. R. GRAVES,
President of the Senate.
*******************************************************************************

State of Maine
Resolves in favor of harmony and union
Resolved, That we the people of the State of Maine devotedly cherish the constitution and laws of the United States, and have ever been willing to assist in maintaining the National Union, and to respect faithfully the rights of all its members.
Resolved, That in the present attempt to coerce the government of the United States, and the will of the majority of the people thereof, to the will of the minority, by treason most foul, and rebellion the most unjustifiable, it is the right and the duty of the state to proffer to the national government for its own maintenance and for the suppression of this treason and rebellion. all the means and resources which it can command.
Resolved, That while as a member of the family of the states, we are ever ready to review our course in reference to any seeming infringement of the rights of sister states, still we can never so far forget the pride of our sovereignty, or the dignity of our manhood, as to hold parley with treason or with traitors.
Resolved, That whenever we shall see the sentiment of patriotism and devotion to American liberty manifested in the slave-holding states, we will vie with such states in the restoration of harmony, and will tender to such, every fraternal concession consistent with the security of our own citizens.
Resolved, That it is our right and our solemn purpose, with "our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor," to defend to the last our Federal Government, and the strength and the glory of our national capitol, by whatever hands assailed,as the only hope of our own and of the world's freedom and progress.
********************************************************************

Joint Resolutions of the Legislature of the State of Minnesota, on the state of the Union. Adopted January 22, 1861.
1. Resolved, That one of the vital and necessary principles which form the basis of all free governments, is that the constitutional majority must always rule. And therefore, the right of the people of any State to withdraw from the Union, thereby hazarding the liberties and happiness of the millions comprising this Confederacy, can never be acknowledged by us under any circumstances.
We regard secession upon the part of any State as amounting directly to revolution, and precipitating civil war with all its sad train of consequences.
2. Resolved, That the people of the State of Minnesota re-iterate their unalterable devotion to the Constitution of the United States, and that if its provisions are strictly observed, it will, in its own words, ensure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessing of liberty to ourselves and our posterity.
3. Resolved, That ABRAHAM LINCOLN and HANNIBAL HAMLIN, having been constitutionally and legally elected President and Vice President of the United States, at a general election fully and freely participated in, on the same day, by the people of every State of the Union, South as well as North, that any attempt to dissolve or destroy the Union on account thereof, is without excuse or justification, and should receive the condemnation of every patriot in the land.
4. Resolved, That we have heard with astonishment and indignation of the recent outrages perpetrated at Charleston, South Carolina, by firing upon an American steamer, sailing under the flag of our country, and that we expect of the General Government the strongest and most vigorous effort to assert its supremacy, and to check the work of rebellion and treason. Fully impressed with our duty to make every possible effort to uphold the Union, and to maintain the authority of the General Government, we hereby tender to the President of the United States, for that purpose, through the Governor of this State, aid in men and money, to the extent of our ability.
When one or more States erect the standard of disunion, and place themselves in military array against the Government bequeathed to us by our ancestors, we can discover no other honorable or patriotic resource than to test, both on land and on ocean, the full strength of the Federal authority under our National Flag.
5. Resolved, That we declare to each State of this Union our sincere desire to secure a renewal of that fraternal feeling which ought always to exist between citizens of a common country, and which distinguished the history of the nation for more than half a century. Especially do we express to those patriotic citizens of the Southern States, who have nobly and manfully exerted their utmost effort to prevent the catastrophe of dissolution, our sincere gratitude and highest admiration.
6. Resolved, That the most sincere thanks of the nation are justly due to that distinguished patriot and veteran, Lt. General Winfield Scott for the prompt and decisive steps he has taken to stay the tide of revolution, and for the determined spirit he has evinced in maintaining the honor of our Government.
7. Resolved, That we never will consent or submit to the obstruction of the free navigation of the Mississippi river, from its source to its mouth, by any power hostile to the Federal Government.
8. Resolved, That the Governor of this State is hereby requested to transmit a copy of these resolutions to the President of the United States, to Lt. General Winfield Scott, and to each of our Senators and Representatives in the Congress of the United States, and to the Governors of the several States.
IGNATIUS DONNELLY,
President of the Senate.
JARED BENSON,
Speaker of the House of Representatives.




[ Edited Mon Jan 13 2014, 05:01PM ]
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gpthelastrebel
Thu Jul 19 2012, 09:21PM

Registered Member #1
Joined: Tue Jul 17 2007, 02:46PM
Posts: 3695

California:

passed at the

Twelfth Session of the Legislature
1861

Begun Monday the Seventh Day of January, and ended on Monday the Twelfth Day of May.

Page 686

No. XVIII. Concurrent Resolution
(Adopted May 17, 1861)
Resolved, By the Senate, the Assembly concurring that the people of California are devoted to the Constitution and Union of the United States , and will not fail in fidelity and fealty to that Constitution and Union, now in hour of trial and peril. That california is ready to maintain the rights and honor of the national Government at home and abroad, and at all times to respond to any requisition that may be made upon her to defend the Republic against foreign and domestic foes.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The research you requested has been completed. I believe the attached
concurrent resolution of the California Senate and Assembly (Stats 1861,
Senate Concurrent Resolution XVIII) is the document for which you are
searching.

If this is not the document you are looking for, please give us more
specific information in regard to the record in which you are
interested.

Best,

Jessica

Jessica M. Herrick, Archivist
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Reference Coordinator
California State Archives
1020 O Street
Sacramento, CA 95814
Reference Desk Phone: 916-653-2246
Reference Desk Fax: 916-653-7363
Reference E-Mail: ArchivesWeb©sos.ca.gov
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This is all we were able to find. To do additional research, you can view the statute books and Assembly Journals online via the Chief Clerk of the Assembly’s website:



http://192.234.213.35/clerkarchive/



From the appropriate drop-down menu on the left side of the webpage, click on the year of interest. On the splash page that then comes up, click on “Index.” A pdf will then load (this sometimes takes several minutes, as these are very large documents!), and you can search through the index as needed. You can then view the appropriate page by clicking on the page or chapter range on the splash page.



Best,



Jessica



Jessica M. Herrick, Archivist






[ Edited Mon Jan 13 2014, 04:56PM ]
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gpthelastrebel
Fri Aug 17 2012, 02:46PM

Registered Member #1
Joined: Tue Jul 17 2007, 02:46PM
Posts: 3695
Connecticut

A Proclamation
By his Excellency the Governor

Eleven States of the Union are now armed and in open rebellion against federal authority; they have paralyzed the business of the nation, have involved us in civil war, and are now exerting their combined energies to rob us of the blessing of a free government. The greatness of their crime has no parallel in the history of human governments. At this critical juncture, our liberties are still further imperilled by the utterance of seditious language; by a traitorous press, which excuses or justifies the rebellion; by secret organizations, which propose to resist the laws of this State by force; by public exhibition of “peace flags’ falsely so called; and by an effort to redress regardless of the forms and officers of the law.
The very exsistence of our government, the future prosperity of this entire nation, and the hopes of universal demand that these outrages be suppressed.
The constitution guarantees liberty of speech and the press, but holds the person and the press responsible for the evils which result for the evils which result from this liberty. It guarantees the protection of property, but it regards as sacred which is used to subvert governmental authority, it guarantees the person from unreasonable seizure, but it protects no individual from arrest and punishment who gives aid and confort to the enemies of our country. It provides by law for the punishment of offences, but allows no grievance to be redressed by violence.
I therefore call upon the citizens of this state to support and uphold the authority and dignity of this government, and to abstain from any act which can tend to encourage and strengthen this conspiracy; and I call upon the officers of the law to be active, diligent and fearless in arresting and instituting legal proceedings for the punishment of those who disturb the public peace, of those guilty of sedition and treason, and those who are embraced in combinations to obstruct the execution of the
laws; so that peace may be again restored to our distracted country, and the liberties of the people be preserved.
Given under my hand, and the seal of this state at Hartford, this thirty-first day of August, A.D. 1861
Wm. A. Buckingham
By his excellency’s command.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A Proclamation
By his Excellency the Governor

Eleven States of the Union are now armed and in open rebellion against federal authority; they have paralyzed the business of the nation, have involved us in civil war, and are now exerting their combined energies to rob us of the blessing of a free government. The greatness of their crime has no parallel in the history of human governments. At this critical juncture, our liberties are still further imperilled by the utterance of seditious language; by a traitorous press, which excuses or justifies the rebellion; by secret organizations, which propose to resist the laws of this State by force; by public exhibition of “peace flags’ falsely so called; and by an effort to redress regardless of the forms and officers of the law.
The very existence of our government, the future prosperity of this entire nation, and the hopes of universal demand that these outrages be suppressed.
The constitution guarantees liberty of speech and the press, but holds the person and the press responsible for the evils which result for the evils which result from this liberty. It guarantees the protection of property, but it regards as sacred which is used to subvert governmental authority, it guarantees the person from unreasonable seizure, but it protects no individual from arrest and punishment who gives aid and confort to the enemies of our country. It provides by law for the punishment of offences, but allows no grievance to be redressed by violence.
I therefore call upon the citizens of this state to support and uphold the authority and dignity of this government, and to abstain from any act which can tend to encourage and strengthen this conspiracy; and I call upon the officers of the law to be active, diligent and fearless in arresting and instituting legal proceedings for the punishment of those who disturb the public peace, of those guilty of sedition and treason, and those who are embraced in combinations to obstruct the execution of the
laws; so that peace may be again restored to our distracted country, and the liberties of the people be preserved.

Given under my hand, and the seal of this state at Hartford, this thirty-first day of August, A.D. 1861

Wm. A. Buckingham
By his excellency’s command.

Source: Connecticut State Library, Ms jenny Groome assisting



Source: Connecticut State Library, Ms jenny Groome assisting

[ Edited Mon Jan 13 2014, 04:54PM ]
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gpthelastrebel
Mon Aug 20 2012, 08:30PM

Registered Member #1
Joined: Tue Jul 17 2007, 02:46PM
Posts: 3695
Michigan

No. 12

JOINT RESOLUTION in reference to the rebellion

Wheras, The Government of the United States is engaged in putting down a causeless and wicked rebellion against its authority and sovereignty, inaugurated by ambitious men to obtain political power – a Government, the safety and perpetuity of which must ever rest upon the loyalty of its citizens and adherence to the Constitution;

And whereas, The Welfare of mankind, the usefulness and power of the nation, are involved in the events and issues of the present conflict; therefore, be it

Resolved, (the House concurring) That Michigan, loyal to herself and to the Federal Government, reaffirms her undying hostility to traitors, her abiding love for freedom, and her confidence in the wisdom and patriotism of the national administration.

Resolved, (the House concurring) That the people of Michigan deem it imperative duty of the Government to speedily put down all insurrection against its authority and sovereignty, by the use of every constitutional means and by the employment of every energy it possesses; that Michigan stands firm in her determination to sustain by men and treasure, the Constitution and the Union, and claims that the burthen of loyal man should be lightened, as far as possible, by confiscating, to the largest extent, the property of all insurrectionists; and that as between the institution of slavery and the Federal Government Michigan does not hesitate to say, that in such exigency, slavery, should be swept from the land, and our country maintained.

Resolved that the Governor be requested to forward a copy of the foregoing preamble and resolution to each of our Senators and representatives in Congress.

Approved January 18, 1862



note:
The PDF I received did not have the spaces between each paragraph, they were simplly indented. For some reason my reply would not show on the forum with the indentions.

GP

[ Edited Mon Jan 13 2014, 04:49PM ]
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gpthelastrebel
Wed Aug 22 2012, 02:56PM

Registered Member #1
Joined: Tue Jul 17 2007, 02:46PM
Posts: 3695
Oregon

Mon, August 20, 2012 3:43:32 PMRE:
From: "ARCHIVES, Reference" View Contact
To: george purvis


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

George:

You will need to examine the old Oregon Laws volumes for that time period in order to locate such a record of the legislature issuing support for the Union.

We have some of the old Oregon Laws volume from that general time period in our holdings; the State Law Library in the Supreme Court building here in Salem would also have them, as would the various county law libraries around the state.

Sincerely,

Todd Shaffer
Archives Reference

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

RE: Re:
From: "ARCHIVES, Reference" View Contact
To: george purvis


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

George:
I am not aware of these old laws volumes appearing anywhere online, no.

Todd



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gpthelastrebel
Sat Aug 25 2012, 04:11PM

Registered Member #1
Joined: Tue Jul 17 2007, 02:46PM
Posts: 3695
Rhode Island--

The handwriting in this letter was very poor. Pam Watts and I transcribed it to the best of our ability, which may not be 100% accurate. We are sure the content of the lettert has not been changed. See PDF posted. Transceiber Pam Watts.

GP

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Resolution of thanks to his excellency Wm. Sprague

Resolved that the action of his excellency the governor in tendering to the president of the United States the service of our ? And infantry and a battalion of artillary for the protection of the national capital and his subsequent proceddings to carry out to the fullest intent the necessary means for rendering this service efficcent with the most cordial approvalof this assembly and the thanks of this General Assembly be and they are hereby tendered to His Excellency for his prompt and efficienct actions.

April 17th 1861
read and passed
by order ----------------
Sec of State

In the house of Representatives
Aprill 17th 1861
Read and concurred with an admendment by ----- the word “legislature” and inserting therefore the words general assembly.
By order
Thomas L. Anthony, Clerk

April 17, 1861
Read and Concured the admendment

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Mr. Purvis,



Aside from a General Assembly resolution of thanks dated April 17th, 1861 to Governor William Sprague for his actions in tendering to the President of the US the services of RI troops to defend the capital no issues relative to support for the Union were identify among the proceedings of the legislature or extant proclamations issued by the governor. Provided attachment is a copy of that resolution.



Ken Carlson

Reference Archivist

Office of the Secretary of State A. Ralph Mollis

State Archives Division

337 Westminster Street

Providence, RI 02903

tel. 401 - 222 - 2359

fax. 401 - 222 - 3199


kcarlson©sos.ri.gov



statearchives©sos.ri.gov


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




IPHFH
resolution_april_17_1861.pdf





[ Edited Mon Jan 13 2014, 04:46PM ]
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