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Southern Heritage Advancement Preservation and Education :: Forums :: General :: Articles and Article Archive
 
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A letter Concerning the name change for Confederate named bases
Moderators: gpthelastrebel, 8milereb, Patrick
Author Post
gpthelastrebel
Tue Aug 23 2022, 11:28PM

Registered Member #1
Joined: Tue Jul 17 2007, 02:46PM
Posts: 4074
This should have been posted sometime ago but it had slipped my mind. Now the discussion of Confederate named bases has come up again and probally will fo some time I feel like it is still relevant.


July 24, 2020
They Were More Than Just Confederates

Vice President Pence,
Sir, I am an amateur historian and webmaster of 3 websites at-http://southernheritageadvancementpreservationeducation.com/page.php?4
They are Southern Heriage Advancement Preservation and education--
Main
Yankee Atrocities
Negros In Gray

I can absolutely back up what I state with documents of that period.

With all the talk about changing the names and the recent vote of the military bases named after Confederate Generals, I thought I would present to you some factual and sourced material that you can pass to President Trump. Please feel free to pass a copy on to General Milley and those Congressmen or Senators working to change the base names. It does appear they know nothing about history.

These Confederate generals have been accused of treason. One, the fact of the matter is NO Confederate was charged and tried for treason. These men all resigned their US Army commissions, some well before the war started. Two, they were citizens of another country; it would be impossible for them to commit treason.

Another fact that is often stated that is not true—the war was all about slavery. No, that is not true. The South WAS NOT fighting for slavery. Buchanan said it, Lincoln said it, Davis said it. I have challenged many people, from all walks of life and various degrees of education, to prove this statement not to be true. At this time, not one person has come up with any credible fact or source to support this statement. I make the same challenge to each and every Congressman and Senator, prove me wrong.

If the effort goes forward to change the name of these bases, tell me why in the world would a descendant of Confederates want to defend a country that suppress his or her heritage?
Best Regards,

George Purvis
3501 Oak Ave.
Gulfport , Mississippi
39507
Email--- george8576©att.net
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gpthelastrebel
Tue Aug 23 2022, 11:36PM

Registered Member #1
Joined: Tue Jul 17 2007, 02:46PM
Posts: 4074
Vol 1, p. 420 http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/542*.html

Class of 1829--- Robert E. Lee

ROBERT E. LEE1

(Ap'd Va.) 2

Robert Edward Lee: Born Jan. 19, 1807, Stratford Hall, VA.

Military History. — Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1825, to July 1, 1829, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to

Bvt. Second Lieut., Corps of Engineers, July 1, 1829.

Second Lieut., Corps of Engineers, July 1, 1829.

Served: as Asst. Engineer in the construction of Fts. Monroe and Calhoun, for the Defense of Hampton Roads, Va., 1829‑34; as Assistant to the Chief Engineer, at Washington, D. C., 1834‑37; as Asst. Astronomer

(First Lieut., Corps of Engineers, Sep. 21, 1836)

for establishing the Boundary between the States of Ohio and Michigan, 1835;a as Superintending Engineer of the improvement of St. Louis harbor, Mo., and of the Missouri and Upper Mississippi Rivers, 1837‑41,

(Captain, Corps of Engineers, July 7, 1838)

having general charge of the improvement of the Lower Mississippi, and of the Ohio River, below Louisville, Ky., 1840‑41, — and of the construction and repairs of the defenses at the Narrows entrance to New York harbor, 1841‑44, 1844‑46; as Member of the Board of Visitors to the Military Academy, 1844; as Assistant to the Chief Engineer, at Washington, D. C., 1844; as Member of the Board of

Engineers for Atlantic Coast Defenses, Sep. 8, 1845, to Mar. 13, 1848; in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged on the march towards Chihuahua, as Chief Engineer of the column commanded by Brig.‑General Wool, 1846, — Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Reconnoissance, Apr. 15‑17, and Battle

(Bvt. Major, Apr. 18, 1847,
for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battle of Cerro Gordo, Mex.)

of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Reconnoissance through the Pedregal, Aug. 18‑19, 1847, — Battle of Contreras, Aug. 19‑20, 1847, — Reconnoissance of Coyoacan, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco, Aug. 20,

(Bvt. Lieut.‑Col., Aug. 20, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct
in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mex.)

1847, — Battle of Molino del Rey, Sep. 8, 1847, — Reconnoissance of the Approaches to the City of Mexico, Sep. 9‑13, 1847, — Storming of Chapultepec, Sep. 13, 1847, where he was wounded, — and Assault and Capture p421 of the City of Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; on Special duty in the

(Bvt. Colonel, Sep. 13, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battle of Chapultepec, Mex.)

Engineer Bureau at Washington, D. C., 1848; as Superintending Engineer of the construction of Ft. Carroll, Patapsco River, Md., 1848‑52; as Member of the Board of Engineers for Atlantic Coast Defenses, July 21, 1848, to Apr. 11, 1852; as Superintendent of the U. S. Military Academy, Sep. 1, 1852, to Mar. 31, 1855;b in command at Jefferson Barracks,

(Lieut.‑Colonel, 2d Cavalry, Mar. 3, 1855)

Mo., 1855; on frontier duty at Camp Cooper, Tex., 1856, — Expedition against Comanche Indians, 1856, — Camp Cooper, Tex., 1856‑57, — San Antonio, Tex. (commanding regiment), 1857; on leave of

absence, 1857‑59; in command of the forces at Harper's Ferry, for suppressing John Brown's Raid, Oct. 17‑25, 1859; in command of the Department of Texas, Feb. 6 to Dec. 12, 1860; and on leave of absence, 1860‑61.

(Colonel, 1st Cavalry, Mar. 16, 1861)

Resigned, Apr. 25, 1861.

Joined in the Rebellion of 1861‑66 against the United States. c

Civil History. — President of Washington College, Lexington, Va., Sep. 28, 1865, to Oct. 12, 1870.

Died, Oct. 12, 1870, at Lexington, Va.: Aged 64.

Buried, Lee Memorial Chapel, Lexington, VA.

The Author's Note:
1 Was the son of Colonel Henry Lee, of the Revolutionary Army, and in 1791 Governor of Virginia.

Thayer's Notes:
a This isn't quite the placid job it sounds like; for the 1835 "Toledo War" between Ohio and Michigan, see Harlow, The Road of the Century, pp246‑247.

b Lee Barracks is named for him, and his memory is revered at the Academy, Grant, Pershing, Indicates McArthur, and Eisenhower.

*************************************
Class of 1827 LEONIDAS POLK

Vol. I p391
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/477*.html

(Born N. C.)


LEONIDAS POLK

(Ap'd N. C.) 8

Born April 10, 1806, Raleigh, NC.

Military History. — Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1823, to July 1, 1827, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to

Bvt. Second Lieut. of Artillery, July 1, 1827.

On leave of absence, July 1 to Dec. 1, 1827.

Resigned, Dec. 1, 1827.

Civil History. — Clergyman, Protestant Episcopal Church, 1831‑38. Missionary Bishop of Arkansas, and the Indian Territory south of 36°30′, with provisional charge of the Diocese of Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and the Missions in the Republic of Texas, 1838‑41. Bishop of the Diocese of Louisiana, 1841‑61.

Joined in the Rebellion of 1861‑66 against the United States.a

Killed, on Pine Mountain, near Marietta, Ga., June 14, 1864: Aged 58.

Buried, Christ Church Episcopal Cathedral, New Orleans, LA.

Thayer's Note:
a As with other Confederate officers, Cullum's Register omits his war record; a close friend of classmate Indicates a West Point graduate and gives his Class. Jefferson Davis during his cadet years, he was given the command of an army corps, but was a mediocre general, whose death would be of more value to the Confederacy than his living command. The details are supplied in many places online, for example at Find-a‑Grave and the eHistory Archive.

***********************************



CLASS OF 1847 Ambrose P. Hill.

Vol. II p314 http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/1345*.html

(Born Va.)

AMBROSE P. HILL

(Ap'd Va.)

15

Ambrose Powell Hill: Born Nov. 9, 1825, Culpeper, VA.

Military History. — Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1847, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to

Bvt. Second Lieut., 1st Artillery, July 1, 1847.

Served: in the War with Mexico, 1847‑48, being engaged in the Combat

(Second Lieut., 1st Artillery, Aug. 26, 1847)

of Huamantla, Oct. 9, 1847, — and Action of Atlixco, Oct. 12, 1847; in garrison at Ft. McHenry, Md., 1848‑49; in Florida Hostilities against the Seminole Indians, 1849‑50; in garrison at Key West, Fla., 1850, 1851; on frontier duty at Camp Ricketts (Edinburg), Tex., 1852; in

(First Lieut., 1st Artillery, Sep. 4, 1851)

garrison at Barrancas Barracks, Fla., 1852‑53; in Florida Hostilities against the Seminole Indians, 1853‑55; in the Office of the Superintendent of the Coast Survey, Washington, D. C., Nov. 23, 1855, to Oct. 26, 1860; and on leave of absence, 1860‑61.

Resigned, Mar. 1, 1861.

Joined in the Rebellion of 1861‑66 against the United States,a and was

Killed, Apr. 2, 1865, near Petersburg, Va.: Aged 40.

Buried, Ambrose Hill Monument, Richmond, VA.

Thayer's Note:
a As with other Confederate officers, Cullum's Register omits his war record: he is the great Southern general usually referred to as A. P. Hill. The deficiency is made good on several websites, e.g., at Encyclopedia Virginia; and he and the troops he commanded are mentioned very frequently thruout Freeman's R. E. Lee, q.v.

********************************************

CLASS OF 1846 George E. Pickett
Vol. IIp304 http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/1330*.html

(Born Va.)

GEORGE E. PICKETT

(Ap'd Ill.) 59

George Edward Pickett: Born Jan. 16, 1825, Richmond, VA.

Military History. — Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1842, to July 1, 1846, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to

Bvt. Second Lieut., 8th Infantry, July 1, 1846.

Served: in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged in the Siege

(Second Lieut., 2d Infantry, Mar. 3, 1847)

of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18,

(Transferred to 7th Infantry, July 13, 1847,
and to 8th Infantry, July 18, 1847)

1847, — Capture of San Antonio, Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Churubusco,

(Bvt. First Lieut., Aug. 20, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct
in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mex.)

Aug. 20, 1847, — Battle of Molino del Rey, Sep. 8, 1847, — Storming of Chapultepec, Sep. 13, 1847, — and Assault and Capture of the City of

(Bvt. Capt., Sep. 13, 1847, for Gallant Conduct at Chapultepec, Mex.)

Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847; in garrison at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1848; on frontier duty on March through Texas to Ft. Gates, 1849‑50, 1851, —

(First Lieut., 8th Infantry, June 28, 1849)

Camp Johnston, Tex., 1852, — Ft. Chadbourne, Tex., 1852‑53, — Ft. p305 Clark, Tex., 1853, — and Ft. Bliss, Tex., 1854‑55; in garrison at Ft.

(Captain, 9th Infantry, Mar. 3, 1855)

Monroe, Va., 1855; and on frontier duty on Expedition against hostile Indians on Puget Sound, Wash., to June, 1856, — Ft. Steilacoom, Wash., 1856,1 — Ft. Bellingham, Wash., 1856‑58, 1859, — San Juan Island, Wash., 1859, — Ft. Bellingham, Wash., 1859‑60, — and San Juan Island, Wash., 1860‑61.

Resigned, June 25, 1861.

Joined in the Rebellion of 1861‑66 against the United States.a

Civil History. — Merchant, Norfolk, Va., 1866‑75.


Died, July 30, 1875, at Norfolk, Va.: Aged 50.

Buried, Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, VA.

The Author's Note:
1 Received the thanks of the Legislature of the Territory of Washington "for the gallant and firm discharge of his duties under the most trying circumstances while he was in command of the Island of San Juan."

Thayer's Note:
a As with other Confederate officers, Cullum's Register omits his war record: he is the man forever remembered as leading "Pickett's Charge" on the battlefield of Gettysburg. The details can be read on many websites, among them the Find-a‑Grave page linked above (where his Class ranking, however, "49th of 56 Cadets who finished", is doubly wrong: he placed 59th of 59).

A more interesting page than usual on Gen. Pickett, especially with regard to his wives and children, can be read at FortWiki.

*******************************************

Class of 1853 John Bell Hood
Vol. II p567 http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/1622*.html

(Born Ky.)

JOHN B. HOOD

(Ap'd Ky.) 44

John Bell Hood: Born June 29, 1831, Owensville, KY.

Military History. — Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1849, to July 1, 1853, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to

Bvt. Second Lieut. of Infantry, July 1, 1853.

Served: in garrison at Ft. Columbus, N. Y., 1853‑54; on frontier duty at Ft. Jones, Cal., 1854‑55, — escorting Lieut. Indicates a West Point graduate and gives his Class. Williamson's Topographical party, 1855, — Ft. Mason, Tex., 1856‑57, — Scouting, 1857, being

(Second Lieut., 2d Cavalry, Mar. 3, 1855)

engaged in a hand-to‑hand Conflict with Lipan and Comanche Indians, at the head of Devil's Run, Tex., July 20, 1857, where he was severely wounded, — Ft. Mason, Tex., 1857‑58, — Camp Cooper, Tex., —

(First Lieut., 2d Cavalry, Aug. 18, 1858)

Camp Colorado, Tex., 1858‑59, — and Camp Wood, Tex., 1859‑60; and on leave of absence, 1860‑61.

Resigned, Apr. 16, 1861.

Joined in the Rebellion of 1861‑66 against the United States.a

Civil History. — Engaged in Insurance Business, at New Orleans, La., 18–––.

Died, Aug. 30, 1879, at New Orleans, La.: Aged 48.

Buried, Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, LA.

Thayer's Note:
a As with other Confederate officers, Cullum's Register omits his war record. He was one of the most famous generals of the war, and many webpages cover his career, among them the Find-a‑Grave page linked above.

****************************************

CLASS OF 1838 P. G. T. BEAUREGARD

Vol. I p697 http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/America/United_States/Army/USMA/Cullums_Register/942*.html

(Born La.)

P. G. T. BEAUREGARD

(Ap'd La.) 2

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard: Born May 28, 1818, St. Bernard, LA.

Military History. — Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1834, to July 1, 1838, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to

Second Lieut., 1st Artillery, July 1, 1838.

Second Lieut., Corps of Engineers, July 7, 1838.

Served: as Asst. Engineer in the building of Ft. Adams, Newport harbor, R. I., 1838‑39, — of the defenses of Pensacola harbor, Fla.,

(First Lieut., Corps of Engineers, June 16, 1839)

1839‑40, — of Survey of Barataria Bay, La., 1840‑41, — and of repairs of Ft. Jackson, Mississippi River, La., 1841; as Superintending Engineer in the building of Tower Dupré, and of the repairs of the defenses of the eastern passes to New Orleans, La., 1841‑44, and 1845‑46, — and of repairs of Ft. McHenry, Md., 1844‑45; in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged in the construction of the defenses of Tampico, 1846‑47, — Siege of Vera Cruz, Mar. 9‑29, 1847, — Reconnoissance and Battle of Cerro Gordo, Apr. 17‑18, 1847, — Reconnoissance of the Pedregal, Aug. 19, 1847, — Battle of Contreras, Aug. 19‑20, 1847, — Reconnoissance

(Bvt. Capt., Aug. 20, 1847, for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct
in the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mex.)

of the approaches to the City of Mexico, Sep. 9‑13, 1847, — Battle of Chapultepec, Sep. 13, 1847, — and Assault and Capture of the City of

(Bvt. Major, Sep. 13, 1847,
for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battle of Chapultepec, Mex.)

Mexico, Sep. 13‑14, 1847, where he was wounded in storming the "Causeway Battery," and again near the Belen Gate; as Superintending Engineer in the building of Ft. Gaines, Mobile harbor, Ala., 1848‑49, — of the repairs of Fts. St. Philip and Jackson, La., 1849‑52, — and building of Ft. Livingston, La., 1849‑52; as Member of a special Board of Engineers for the improvement of the Delta of the Mississippi, and construction of a harbor on Lake Pontchartrain, La., 1852‑53; as Superintending engineer

(Captain, Corps of Engineers, Mar. 3, 1853, for Fourteen Years' Continuous Service)

p698 of New Orleans Custom-House, La., 1853‑60; in general supervision of opening of S. W. Pass into Mississippi River, and construction of a harbor on Lake Pontchartrain, La., 1853; as Member of a special Board of Engineers for projecting the defenses on the Gulf Frontier of Alabama, Mississippi, and Texas, 1857, — and for the protection of the site of Ft. McRee, Fla., 1858; as Superintending Engineer of New Orleans Marine Hospital and Quarantine Warehouses, 1859‑60; and as Superintendent of the U. S. Military Academy, Jan. 23‑28, 1861.

Resigned, Feb. 20, 1861.

Civil History. — Chief Engineer for Drainage of the site of New Orleans, La., 1858‑61.

Joined in the Rebellion of 1861‑66 against the United States.a

Civil History. — Civil Engineer since 1866. Tendered the Chief Command of the Army of Roumania, 1866 (declined); and that of the Egyptian Army, 1869 (declined). Adjutant-General of the State of Louisiana, 1878 to 18–––. Commissioner of Public Works of New Orleans, La., 1888 to 18–––.

[Supplement, Vol. IV: 1890‑1900]

Vol. IV
p50 Died, Feb. 20, 1893, at New Orleans, La.: Aged 75.

Buried, Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, LA.

Thayer's Note:
a As with other Confederate officers, Cullum's Register omits his war record, which was outstanding; there are of course many websites that cover it. An excellent summary is given at Civil War Home. His name appears more than 300 times in Freeman's biography of Robert E. Lee (onsite); and another 40 times in the section of this site on the History of Louisiana.
Images with borders lead to more information.
The thicker the border, the more information. (Details here.)
UP TO: [Onsite link]
U. S. M. A.
Class of 1838 [Onsite link]
Cullum's
Register [Onsite link]
History of West Point [Onsite link]
American

A page or image on this site is in the public domain ONLY
if its URL has a total of one *asterisk.
If the URL has two **asterisks,
the item is copyright someone else, and used by permission or fair use. If the URL has none the item is © Bill Thayer.
See my copyright page for details and contact information.

***************************************

CLASS OF 1837 BRAXTON BRAGG

[image ALT: A head-and-torso photograph of a middle-aged man with a gaunt air; he has a full but close-cropped beard and moustache, and wears a plain military uniform tunic with two rows of buttons and a high collar. He is the Confederate general Braxton Bragg.]

Vol. I p663

(Born N. C.)

BRAXTON BRAGG

(Ap'd N. C.) 5

Born Mar. 22, 1817, Warren Co., NC.

Military History. — Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1833, to July 1, 1837, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to

Second Lieut., 3d Artillery, July 1, 1837.

Served: in garrison at Ft. Monroe, Va., 1837; in the Florida War, 1837‑38; in the Cherokee Nation, 1838, while transferring the Indians to

(First Lieut., 3d Artillery, July 7, 1838)

the West; in the Florida War, 1838‑39; on Recruiting service, 1840; in the Florida War, 1840‑41, 1841‑42; in garrison at St. Augustine, Fla., 1842‑43, — and Ft. Moultrie, S. C., 1843‑44, 1844‑45; in Military Occupation of Texas, 1845‑46; in the War with Mexico, 1846‑48, being engaged in the Defense of Ft. Brown, Tex., May 3‑9, 1846, — Battle of

(Bvt. Capt., May 9, 1846, for Gallant and Distinguished Conduct in the Defense of Ft. Brown, Tex.)

(Captain, 3d Artillery, June 18, 1846)

Monterey, Sep. 21‑23, 1846, — and Battle of Buena Vista, Feb. 22‑23,

(Bvt. Major, Sep. 23, 1846, for Gallant Conduct in the several Conflicts at Monterey, Mex.)

1847; on the Staff of Bvt. Maj.‑General Gaines, as Acting Asst. Inspector-General,

(Bvt. Lieut.‑Col., Feb. 23, 1847,
for Gallant and Meritorious Conduct in the Battle of Buena Vista, Mex.)

Western Division, Feb. 21 to Aug. 10, 1849; in garrison p664 at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., 1849, 1850‑52, 1853; on frontier duty at Ft. Gibson, I. T., 1853‑54, — and Ft. Washita, I. T., 1854‑55; and on

(Major, 1st Cavalry, Mar. 3, 1855: Declined)

leave of absence, 1855‑56.

Resigned, Jan. 3, 1856.

Civil History. — Sugar Planter, Lafourche Parish, La., 1856‑61. Commissioner of the Board of Public Works of the State of Louisiana, 1859‑61.

Joined in the Rebellion of 1861‑66 against the United States.a

Civil History. — Superintendent of New Orleans Water Works, 1868 to 18–––. Chief Engineer of the Board for the Improvement of the River, Harbor, and Bay of Mobile, Ala., 18––– to 18–––; and of Gulf, Colorado, and Santa Fé, N. M., Railroad, 1874.

Died, Sep. 27, 1876, at Galveston, Tex.: Aged 59.

Buried, Magnolia Cemetery, Mobile, AL.

Thayer's Note:
a As with other Confederate officers, Cullum's Register omits his war record. Braxton Bragg was one of a very small group of officers to rise to the rank of General in the C. S. A., but the ambiguous consensus, both now and pretty much then, is that his tactical victories were turned into strategic defeats. He was timid in following up successes, and was not well supported by his high command: historians stress one or the other of these points and thus vary a great deal as to his share of blame in his ultimate failure. For the details of his Confederate career, see the two pages at Civil War Home.

********************************

Note the dates some of these men resigned, highlighted in red. It was before the war started. Only Lee, Pickett and Hood resigned after the shots were fired at Ft. Sumter,

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